Tag Archives: Trinity

5 YEAR’S TIME: FROM VISITING TRINITY TO MY GRADUATION – Experiencing Trinity as an American

Eli is one of our US students who is in her fourth year in Trinity.  Here she lets us know about her experience of moving to Ireland to study at Trinity. 

The first time I ever set foot in Trinity was November of 2012. It was Thanksgiving break of my senior year in high school and I convinced my family to fly half way around the world with me for what I knew would be a very important college visit.

The moment I walked through the front gate of college I was sold. There’s something magical about strolling in from the loud bustling street into the dark tunnel of front gate. Those big wooden doors transport you into another world, a bright imposing and enduring oasis. After over 400 years of change, so much remains remarkably the same at Trinity. The history really drew me in.Photo 3

We got a tour from an American girl with an Irish accent who had just started her third year here and spent the hour singing its praises. Her stories and reassurances really made me confident that if she could do it so could I.

I met for coffee with a member of the Global Relations Office and a lecturer from the Political Science Department. They both made me feel important, like I was welcome and wanted at Trinity. That feeling, I’m happy to say, has never gone away. As I was leaving campus I wondered if walking down those cobblestone paths between the old stone buildings would feel just as magical if I was there every day. Five years later the magic still hasn’t worn off.

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Almost a year later, in September of 2013, I showed up for my first day of college. The whole first week was a blur. Meeting tons of new people with names I couldn’t pronounce. Joining a million clubs and societies unsure of what I even liked to do. Trying to translate Irish slang. Struggling to cook dinner for myself for the first time. Drinking gallons of tea with my new housemates in Trinity Halls and talking incessantly about what life in Ireland is really like. Everyone was friendly and amazingly welcoming. I can’t appreciate enough how kind and inclusive everyone in this country is. It’s so easy to feel at home here, even amongst strangers.

The entire first year I was so busy making friends, going to balls, trying to understand the weather, having dinner parties, traveling, and panicking over exams, before realising they weren’t really that bad, to stop and think about being homesick or scared. When I went home for the summer I couldn’t wait to come back.

Throughout the next two years I settled into life in Ireland and travelled a ton, taking advantage of Ireland’s amazing sites and proximity to Europe’s most iconic destinations.

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I got a job in the Trinity Global Room giving tours and helping other international students. I moved out of Trinity Halls and rented a house with friends. I put my head down and studied more than ever before for the Schols exams and ended up spending my first Christmas away from home.

I became so much more independent, something I think a lot of American college students miss out on. One of the things I appreciate the most about Trinity is the fact that they don’t coddle you. It’s on you to study, to show up for classes, to find accommodation and to ask for help if you need it. The support services at Trinity are second to none, but at the end of the day it’s up to you to take advantage of them and to push yourself to succeed. While it was intimidating at the time, now that I’m finishing up my time here I feel so confident that I can go out into the real world and take the initiative. I think this is a big reason so many entrepreneurs come out of Trinity. Going to Trinity taught me how to push myself and to earn everything I accomplish.

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I’m in the second semester of my final year now, trying to decide what to do with the rest of my life. Only now looking back, I realise how much I’ve learned, both in and out of the classroom, in the years since I first set foot in Front Square. I’ve gained a global perspective, friends from all over the world, a masters level undergraduate degree, a new home and confidence in who I am. These four years have been the best years of my life. While there have definitely been hard times and some tears and homesickness along the way, I know I’ve grown so much from my time here. I’ve decided I want to stay in Ireland after college is over. I don’t know if I’ll ever be ready to leave. My experience here at Trinity has changed my life for the better and I wouldn’t give it up for the world.

In November of 2017, I’ll be walking through the front gates again, this time to graduate. Five years ago, going to college at Trinity was my dream. I’ve been so lucky that that dream became a reality. While it’ll be hard to say goodbye, I’m happy to know the time I’ve spent here will be a part of me forever.

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If you would like to get to know Trinity College, consider coming along to one of our upcoming US events from 25 March to 4 April in Chicago, Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Washington D.C.

Wor(l)d(l)y: Irish Culture through Accents, Theatre, and Rhetoric

By Michaela Vitagliano [Visiting Student Blogger]

“When you go back for Christmas you’ll have to tell people you shook hands with Taoiseach Enda Kenny (Ireland’s Prime Minister),” my host family advises me.

“Ah, but I only saw him at the Gingerman Bar” I try to explain, until I’m cut off with a laugh and a knowing, “but they won’t know. The Irish way is to embellish a story!”

I’ve always been drawn to stories – not just what they say, but how. When traveling to a new country, I am eager to hear stories – legends, folklore, and historical events—that are part of a country’s culture. Indeed, learning a culture or another person’s identity is inextricably tied to narratives. Just think of the question, “So, what’s your story?”, prompting one to forge a coherent narrative in order to ultimately connect and communicate with others.

Continue reading Wor(l)d(l)y: Irish Culture through Accents, Theatre, and Rhetoric

Sweet Sweet Study Abroad – Exploring Dublin’s Desserts

By Abigail Borges [Visiting Student Blogger]

Sometimes, school is hard. As a firm believer in the power of chocolate, one of the ways I like to get away from class, apart from exploring castles and cathedrals, is indulging a bit in the many sweet(s) opportunities around the city. Maybe you’ve been working hard on a paper all day and need a break, or just escaped a taxing exam, or maybe you’re waking up from a late night of studying and need a perfect pick-me-up. Really, whenever you need it, sweets will be there for you in Dublin, and here are some of the best (click the links and get ready to drool).

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San Diego

By Tadgh Healy

Hi everyone! I’m Tadgh, a third year English Literature & Philosophy TSM student and I’ve just completed my first week studying abroad at the University of California, San Diego.

From the early signs, it’s clear I’ve been incredibly fortunate to land where I am. I chose to study in San Diego primarily because of the quality of education – and in my particular case I had read (and enjoyed) the work of a couple of the professors here, so jumped at the opportunity to be able to sit in their lectures.

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Global Room Student Ambassador Perspective…

By Kelly Konya

Hey everyone! My name is Kelly and I just started working as a Global Room Student Ambassador this very Monday morning. Already today, I have assisted a tour of campus with Byrne Hacking, where we met students from the University of Macau (who all loved Trinity!), and I’ve helped with the set-up of a lunch reception for a graduation ceremony. My first day on the job has already rejuvenated my love for this university and my on-going excitement to be doing research here. I am currently an M.Phil in Irish Writing student but will finish up this August and jump right into my Ph.D with hopes that the momentum will allow me to write my first book!

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Exploring Ireland: The Cliffs of Moher

By Madison Tucky (Visiting Student, Study Abroad Blogger)

In Ireland there are a lot of different places that people told me I should visit, and the most frequently mentioned one was the Cliffs of Moher. The people that I talked to who had been to Ireland before said that I had to visit the Cliffs, that it would be an unbelievable experience I needed to have. I’ll admit, I was kind of skeptical. I’ve seen cliffs before. I’ve been to the Grand Canyon in America. I didn’t think that the Cliffs of Moher would be anything crazy special. They’d be really cool and I was definitely going to go, but to be honest I had very low expectations for my trip out there. While there are a few different companies that take tours to the Cliffs from Dublin, I actually took the bus to Galway and used a tour company there, as I have a friend studying there who wanted to go with me. It was a very nice, easy, and early bus ride to Galway, and then the bus for the tour left from the bus station that I’d been dropped off at, so it was a very easy start to the excursion.

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Living in Rathmines

By Viviana Lletget (Visiting Student, Study Abroad Blogger)

When I first arrived in Ireland I did not know exactly where I was going to live. The process for looking for student housing in Dublin is a grueling process that takes up a lot of your time. It can be a scary thing to wonder if you will find proper housing in a city so far away from home. The good thing is that Dublin is saturated with other international students who either go to Trinity, UCD, or have come to Ireland to study English, and so student housing (in other words temporary housing) is nothing new for landlords. So, finding accommodation is definitely possible no matter how long you are staying, but finding a good fit is the harder battle with so many factors to consider like: mode of transportation to school, safety, and scenery. Finding a place to live in Dublin caused my anxiety to increase, but I want to let you know to not worry because you will find something. You would think that finding a place before moving to Dublin is a smarter choice than to just arrive to the city and stay at a hostel until you find accommodation, but you do not know exactly where you are moving to until you see it, until you experience it. So, though you may go through some panicky moments when trying to get established in a new city, do not fret. I recommend doing the hostel thing until you pick a good spot that is right for you.

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