Tag Archives: Study

Sweet Sweet Study Abroad – Exploring Dublin’s Desserts

By Abigail Borges [Visiting Student Blogger]

Sometimes, school is hard. As a firm believer in the power of chocolate, one of the ways I like to get away from class, apart from exploring castles and cathedrals, is indulging a bit in the many sweet(s) opportunities around the city. Maybe you’ve been working hard on a paper all day and need a break, or just escaped a taxing exam, or maybe you’re waking up from a late night of studying and need a perfect pick-me-up. Really, whenever you need it, sweets will be there for you in Dublin, and here are some of the best (click the links and get ready to drool).

Continue reading Sweet Sweet Study Abroad – Exploring Dublin’s Desserts

Student on exchange in Georgetown University, in Washington, DC

By Sophie Donnelly

My name is Sophie Donnelly and I am a Junior Sophister PPES student on exchange in Georgetown University, in Washington, DC. Although my degree subject is PPES, here at Georgetown I have specialised into a “double-major” of Politics and Economics, and am taking a selection of classes from both of those fields over the course of my year here.

Continue reading Student on exchange in Georgetown University, in Washington, DC

San Diego

By Tadgh Healy

Hi everyone! I’m Tadgh, a third year English Literature & Philosophy TSM student and I’ve just completed my first week studying abroad at the University of California, San Diego.

From the early signs, it’s clear I’ve been incredibly fortunate to land where I am. I chose to study in San Diego primarily because of the quality of education – and in my particular case I had read (and enjoyed) the work of a couple of the professors here, so jumped at the opportunity to be able to sit in their lectures.

Continue reading San Diego

From Southern California to Dublin: Culture Shocks and Assimilation – Coffee, Coins and Self-Deportation

 

By Allison Woodworth, Summer Study Abroad Blogger

“I cried,” my sister said, sheepishly admitting to getting emotional while listening to the “Outlander” soundtrack as she and her boyfriend drove through rural Ireland on their way to visit me in Dublin.  My sister and I grew up in suburban southern California, where the only sheep we saw on a regular basis was the puppet Lamb Chop and where nearby historic sites consisted of late 18th century Spanish Catholic missions. Where San Diego is dotted with palm trees and coastline, Dublin is blanketed in nature and history and rain. I mocked my sister’s emotions as an older sister should, but I couldn’t deny that Ireland was beautiful. Four weeks earlier, I’d found myself staring out the airplane window over Ireland and thinking that this surely embodied “picturesque”. I wasn’t quite sure if it was the 18 hour travel, the lack of sleep, the rabbits hopping around the runways, or the impeccable timing of an early morning arrival to catch my first Irish sunrise, but everything felt surreal.

My nine weeks in Dublin have been grand. I’ve learned to use a French press, broken a French press, almost been pancaked by bike and bus, claimed a couch in the Rathmines library as “my spot”, and was visited by Irish immigration (more on this later). I’ve enjoyed all my small culture shock moments because they personify both the fun and the difficulties of assimilation. Here are a few of my observations, experiences, and culture shock moments:

  • The Library: anyone who knows me won’t be surprised to hear that my “goals after landing” were listed as such: 1) sleep 2) find grocery allison_blog-1_photo-1store 3) locate local library. I was thrilled that the Rathmines public library was a short walk from our dorms. Andrew Carnegie funded construction of Ireland’s first public access library in 1913. Although the two story neo-Georgian building appears huge from the outside, it has a rather small, efficient layout. I did try to immediately sign up for a library card, but they insisted I be a resident or have a resident vouch for me. This was a huge disappointment – I collect library cards like some people collect shot glasses – but I compromised by reading shortallison_blog-1_photo-2 graphic novels and comics when I stopped off on my walk home from work before the closing gong around 8pm. Yes, closing gong. I’m not sure there is a PA in the library. Just before closing, the staff gives bangs a gong by the door to warn patrons to head out – or in my case to jump three feet off my seat in fright. Every time.

Photo 1 (above): Rathmines Library Gong

Photo 2 (left): Rathmines Library

Continue reading From Southern California to Dublin: Culture Shocks and Assimilation – Coffee, Coins and Self-Deportation

A Visit to Belfast, Northern Ireland

By Jessica Murphy, Summer Study Abroad Blogger

My name is Jessica Murphy and I am a rising sophomore at Brown University from New York City. I am still not sure what I am majoring in—or as we call it, “concentrating”—but I am interested in fields ranging from international relations to development studies. In fact, I was initially drawn to the Brown/Trinity summer study abroad programme in Dublin because of my interest in political science. The possibility of studying contemporary international politics, participating in an internship, and living in a completely new country sounded like a remarkable opportunity. I am so glad that I decided to sign up, because it has truly exceeded my (already high) expectations! Dublin is a fascinating city with a rich and layered past, and I have really enjoyed learning and exploring every single day.

Continue reading A Visit to Belfast, Northern Ireland

Exploring Dublin: The Abbey Theatre is a must

By: Viviana Lletget (Visiting Student, Study Abroad Blogger)

In Dublin there is so much to do involving art, music, and street performance, but no matter how long you are visiting Dublin, I suggest going to the Abbey Theater. The Abbey Theater today is not the same original one that was founded in 1904 by the Irish writer W.B. Yeats and Lady Augusta Gregory, but the reconstructed Abbey is still spectacular and carries on the Irish Literary Theater culture in full force on the same site. The historical Abbey Theater was damaged by a fire that took place in 1951, so the Abbey Theater that exists today is an updated version that still reflects an old feel of history. The Abbey Theater was a venue where Irish writers showcased plays that became an essential aspect, a medium, that helped the Irish Literary Revival take place; it was the place where physical manifestations unfolded through performances that gave the Irish and Irishness new form from political and surrealist theater performances. The Abbey Theater is a must to visit while you are in Dublin because the plays are always wonderful, and offer a window into Irish culture.

Continue reading Exploring Dublin: The Abbey Theatre is a must

Global Room Student Ambassador Perspective…

By Kelly Konya

Hey everyone! My name is Kelly and I just started working as a Global Room Student Ambassador this very Monday morning. Already today, I have assisted a tour of campus with Byrne Hacking, where we met students from the University of Macau (who all loved Trinity!), and I’ve helped with the set-up of a lunch reception for a graduation ceremony. My first day on the job has already rejuvenated my love for this university and my on-going excitement to be doing research here. I am currently an M.Phil in Irish Writing student but will finish up this August and jump right into my Ph.D with hopes that the momentum will allow me to write my first book!

Continue reading Global Room Student Ambassador Perspective…