Tag Archives: Listicles

Lists of things to do, places to see, top tips

Make Yourself At Home | Part 1

It’s not always easy settling in as a student. It is hard feeling completely at home in a new place, especially when that place is a dorm room, or a bedroom in a house with 5 other people. Help is at hand however, as we compile a list of some student hacks and DIY touches you can use to settle into Dublin and make yourself at home.

Bed Linen

First things first, you have got to sort out your bed. It’s more than likely taking up a large amount of space in your room, so you might as well make it colourful and easy on the eyes. Ditch the drab monotones and choose colourful bed sheets which will complement the style of your room.

Lights

Lighting is very important in student rooms. Fairy Lights and fake candles add a warm and inviting mood to your room. Equally getting coloured lamp shades (or draping coloured cloth over regular lamp shades) will help negate the harsh white lights often found in student apartments.

Plants

As long as you remember to water them, flowers and plants are a lovely, easy way to bring life and colour to your room.  If you’re simply not the gardener type and your plants are likely to die within days, invest in a cactus instead – they require zero maintenance! Equally, plenty of artificial flowers look quite real and can be bought from a variety of homeware stores.  A potted plant or two will do wonders for your room.

Wall hangings

The walls in student accommodation are often neutral and bare. With repainting them not an option the next best thing is to cover over them up. Posters and photos are a great way to add a personal touch to your walls. Hang photos with pegs from a piece of string, or use some blu-tack so you don’t mark the walls. Stick up photos and memories from home and if something makes you smile, hang it up so you can always see it.

Colour

If in doubt, just try and add colour. Whether it be through furnishings such as rugs and cushions, or simply colourful pictures, the more colour you add the more homely your room will feel. Paint some photo frames in vibrant colours and hang them on your wall. Or recycle some old jars and paint them in bright colours, leaving them on your shelves. Paint your hangers, shelves and furniture or cover them with colour tape and ribbons. ,l.

Need more Inspiration?

Lacking ideas? Try Pinterest and see what other people have done on the cheap to make their halls feel like home!

David  is a marketing intern working with the Global Relations team, and is a current student of Trinity College Dublin.

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Museums of Dublin

Fancy soaking up a bit of history and culture while you’re in Dublin? Why not visit one of the many museums and cultural exhibitions around the city. From Modern Art to Natural History to Leprechauns, Dublin has a lot to offer.

– The Artistic

National_Gallery_of_Ireland_Millennium_wing_outsideNational Gallery of Ireland

Dating back over 150 years and packed full of fantastic pieces from both Irish and European fine art, the National Gallery of Ireland is one of the best ways to spend an inclement afternoon in Dublin. You can take your time exploring the many wings of art and sculpture that it has on offer for free. Take a free audio guide from the information desk or take a free tour to properly immerse yourself in the European and Irish masterpieces, you’ll soon find that many hours have passed along with the bad weather. Entry: Free| Location: Nassau Street

Barry_Flanagan_The_Drummer_IMMAIrish Museum of Modern Art

The Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA), is Ireland’s leading national institution for the collection and presentation of modern and contemporary art. In addition to the collection IMMA presents a dynamic and changing programme of exhibitions from Irish and International Artists, and complimentary education and family programmes throughout the year including a dynamic Talks programme and the IMMA studio and national programmes. The Museum is housed in the 17th century Royal Hospital building in Kilmainham, Dublin, whose beautiful grounds include a formal garden, meadow and medieval burial grounds.  Facilities include a café, bookshop and free guided tours of exhibitions. Entry: Free| Location: Royal Hospital Kilmainham

– The Historic

Dublin-National-History-Museum-2012Natural Museum of Ireland – Natural History

Natural History Museums are common in every European capital and there’s a good reason why. Both adults and children alike love to marvel at the animals and creatures of the past and Dublin has one of the most impressive zoological exhibits. Located within the same complex as the National Museum of Ireland, the natural history building has been operating since 1856 and was restored in 2010 to allow visitors to get more up close and personal with the collection. The ground floor is dedicated to Irish animals, featuring giant deer skeletons and a variety of mammals, birds and fish. The upper floors of the building were laid out in the 19th Century in a scientific arrangement showing animals by taxonomic groupEntry: Free| Location: Merrion Street

National_Museum_of_IrelandNational Museum of Ireland – Archaeology and History

The National Museum Of Ireland was built in the 1880s and today is the national repository for all archaeological objects found in Ireland and is the home to over two million artefacts. The Treasury exhibition space has recently undergone a major refurbishment where you can see iconic artefacts such as the Ardagh Chalice, the Tara Brooch and the Derrynaflan Hoard. As well as these priceless artefacts,  other permanent displays include Irish Silver and glassware, the Viking exhibition, the War of Independence exhibition and more. Make sure to visit the Kingship and Sacrifice exhibition which includes recently found bog bodies! Entry: Free| Location: Kildare Street

Collins_Barracks_Museum_courtyard_westNational Museum of Ireland – Decorative Arts & History

Collins Barracks in Dublin City could be said to be the National Museum of Ireland’s largest artefact, having had a unique history all of its own in another life. Collins Barracks has been completely renovated and restored to become the National Museum of Decorative Arts and History, charting Ireland’s economic, social, political and military progress through the ages.

Artefacts on display range from silver, ceramic and glassware pieces to weaponry, furniture, examples of folk life and costume. All of these are displayed with imagination in innovative and contemporary galleries, which entice you to go further, look harder and examine more closely. Entry: Free| Location: Collins Barracks

– The Unconventional

LeprNational Leprechaun Museum

Irish people have told stories about the Leprechaun for more than a thousand years. There are many tales about him and the people he meets. The National Leprechaun Museum, the first ever attraction dedicated to Irish mythology, opens up a fun and magical world full of fascinating folklore, mythology and enchanting stories. Based in the heart of Dublin, you will explore the museum on a guided tour with a storyteller. They will bring you through the spaces and tell you more about Irish folklore and mythology. You’ll explore spaces that reflect these stories, or recreates experiences typically associated with leprechauns. The result is a series of captivating, interactive experiences – from the first ever sighting back in the eighth century, through to modern day representations of the leprechaun in film and popular culture – and plenty of adventures in between. Entry: €10 for Students| Location: Jervis Street

Little Museum of DublinThe Little Museum of Dublin

The Little Museum of Dublin opened in October 2011. The museum is spaced out on 2 floors of a Georgian house. It recalls what Dublin was all about during the 20th century and the exhibition has been widely praised in the international media. The Little Museum of Dublin tells the story of Dublin city from the year 1900 up to 2000 and showcases the remarkable transformation that the city went through in the last century. Visitors to the museum will witness the violent birth of the Irish nation, the conservative years that followed the false economic hope of the 1960s and the Celtic Tiger boom of the 1990s. Photographs, art and newspapers are some of the artefacts that tell the story of the city along with the influence of politics and power.  Entry: €3 for Students| Location: Stephens Green

National Wax Museum PlusNational Wax Museum Plus

This unique Dublin Museum is an outstandingly original visitor attraction and has been designed to deliver an interactive experience unlike any other museum in the city.  The museum is full of characters and exhibits, from historical figures to cartoon characters, and everything else in between. As indicated by the PLUS in the name, it’s not only wax figures either. The museum has much more to explore and experience, such as the Science and Discovery Zone, Recording Studio and the Wax Factor Green Screen. It’s great fun for all. Entry: €10 for Students| Location: College Green

David  is a marketing intern working with the Global Relations team, and is a current student of Trinity College Dublin.

Breakfast in Dublin

Why not treat yourself some morning and go out for breakfast? Dublin has tons to offer in terms of breakfast bars and early bird deals throughout the city centre. David rounds up some of his favourites and lists them here.

Lemon Crepe & Coffee Co

Two cafes in Dublin’s city centre; one on Dawson Street, (Lemon HQ) and the other on South William Street, (the supposedly trendy one) make up Lemon. Both cafes serve rich coffee and have full breakfast menus with freshly prepared crepes, sandwiches, omelettes, and pastries. The Dawson street café even does Belgian waffles. Check out the menu here. 

Metro Cafe

Styled as a Parisian café, Metro is a top notch Dublin bistro. The friendly staff and outdoor seating area stretching the length of the café are only some of Metro’s many features which make it a great breakfast haunt. Open seven days a week, it offers a great choice of breakfast options, with the pancakes always being a popular choice. Check out what’s on offer here.

KC Peaches

KC Peaches, right beside Trinity, has a great selection of food for breakfast. Ranging from organic yogurt  and fruit, to hot paninis  to the classic irish tea and toast. This bustling café will certainly wake you up with its lively atmosphere and great food. Their menu can be found here.

Fixx Coffeehouse

Based halfway down Dawson Street, Fixx Coffeehouse offers a huge amount of space, filled with low slung couches and even has its own library. This cosy atmosphere is only made better by the great selection of food they have on offer each morning, the greek yogurt, granola and berries being a particularly splendid way to start your day.  Check them out here. 

Hatch & Sons

Hatch & Sons is hidden away opposite St Stephen’s Green in the basement of the Little Museum of Dublin, between Kildare and Dawson street. It’s well worth a visit, as this tiny restaurant serves up simple but really tasty local Irish cuisine. Simple, wholesome breakfast inspired by the traditional kitchen cuisine,  Hatch & Sons is a charming spot for breakfast; check out the menu here.

Marks & Spencers Rooftop Cafe (Grafton Street)

While M&S cafe’s are nothing extraordinary, they do offer a fine selection of food and hot drinks. However it is the rooftop terrace at the top of its Grafton Street store that makes this cafe worth checking out. Visit it on a sunny day, and its lovely to sit outside with a nice cup of tea and hear the sounds of shoppers and buskers rise up to greet you.

Yogism

Fancy an alternative way to enjoy breakfast, how about some frozen yogurt? You can do it yourself, filling up your bowl with all sorts of healthy granolas and berries, or choose from their Breakfast Club menu which includes options of porridge and pancakes. Only downside is it doesn’t open till 9 am. Find them on Facebook.

Queen of Tarts

A charming cafe and patisserie, just off Dame Street, which is run by two sisters (who trained as pastry chefs in New York City in the 1990s). Everything is baked and prepared fresh on the premises adding to a lovely smell and atmosphere throughout the café. They offer a  range of breakfast options, from homemade granola to scrambled eggs with smoked irish salmon, and all are reasonably priced. Check out their menu here.

Brother Hubbard

This small cafe, based on Capel Street, prides itself on being independently run and solely focused on offering you the best food in Dublin. Their simple, but packed, breakfast menu is accompanied by a range of pastries, made fresh  each day by them. They try and source all their produce from local supplier and even filter the water used to make tea and coffee; in short they do all they can to ensure you have a great meal.

David  is a marketing intern working with the Global Relations team, and is a current student of Trinity College Dublin.

Cinemas in Dublin

Dublin City has a lot to offer in terms of cinemas and movie theatres. From the latest blockbusters to foreign language films, Dublin has it all on show, as long as you know where to look. David lists five cinemas in the city centre that all movie lovers should check out.

1. The Screen Cinema

Located right beside Trinity College, though easy to miss (walk out of Front Arch and turn right), the Screen Cinema is known for its mix of modern films and older classics. The Screen is Dublin’s longest running art house cinema with the cinema’s proximity to Trinity College attracting a young, arty student crowd. There are the obvious Hollywood blockbusters on show here, but the Screen regularly sneaks a good deal of foreign language films and childhood favourites onto its two screen. It has special offers on Thursday nights where tickets are only €5. Check out what’s playing there now. 

2. The Savoy Cinema

Situated right on O’Connell Street, the Savoy Cinema is Dublin’s oldest working cinema. Built in 1929, the Savoy is full of atmosphere, from the spacious wood-panelled foyer to the upstairs lobby. The Savoy regularly plays host to the glamorous film premieres of Ireland. It shows a large variety of the latest hollywood films in its seven screens. Check out what’s on here.

3. Cineworld

The largest multiplex cinema in Dublin’s city centre boasts 17 screens and an IMAX screen. Based on Parnell Street, Cineworld shows a wide range of Irish and international films with all the big blockbusters coming through its screens. It boasts a large selection of Box office treats and sweets. Cineworld has everything you need to enjoy a trip to the movies. Check out what’s showing here. 

4. Rathmines Omniplex Cinema

Situated slightly outside the city centre, on the Rathmines road, the Rathmines Omniplex Cinema (previously the Swan Cinema) is a newly renovated complex with five screens showing the latest big blockbusters. All the screens have reclining seats with ample leg space and totally unrestricted views. Only a 20 minute walk from Trinity College (or 10 mins on the bus) the cinema is surrounded by a host of restaurants and pubs so you can extend your night out. Check out what’s on now. 

5. The Lighthouse Cinema

Possibly the most colourful cinema in all of Dublin, the Light House Cinema is a specialist, art house cinema committed to programming the best Irish and international films. It’s eclectic schedule includes feature films, shorts, classics, foreign language and animated films, feature length documentaries, inventive special events and festivals. Located in the up and coming Smithfield quarter north of the River Liffey, the Lighthouse champions independent world cinema and offbeat Irish productions. The brand new, high tech building features four screens and has the some of the comfiest, and colourful, seats in Dublin. Check out what’s on here.

Best Student Friendly Restaurants in Dublin?

No matter the time of year, students are always on the look out for opportunities to eat out without breaking the bank, David rounds up some of his favourite student (and budget) friendly restaurants in the city.

1. The Mongolian Barbeque

Mongolian BBQ in Temple Bar prides itself on being one of Dublin’s most unique dining experiences. The idea is simple, you get a bowl and fill it with raw ingredients; from fresh meats to a huge array of seasonal vegetables. Add some Herbs and spices of your choice, and finally top off your creation from the specially selected sauces. Then just hand your bowl to one of the grillers and they will stir-fry it to perfection, right in front of your eyes. The more you can manage to fit into your bowl, the more food you can have! One trip to the buffet costs €5.90 with their Lunch Special (12pm to 4.30pm), and they offer student discounts on top! Check out the menu.

2. Tolteca

One of the closest burrito places to Trinity, Tolteca is a favourite for many students due to its good food and fast service. Located on Suffolk Street, just off Grafton Street, Tolteca offers a €6.50 Student Deal which covers a full burrito and a drink (with free refills!). Check out the menu.

3. KC Peaches

One of the closest, if not the closest restaurant to Trinity, KC Peaches offers healthy and filling lunch and dinner options. They have a range of different sized takeaway boxes and eat-in plates, starting from as little as €5. With a large variety of self-serving salads and hot meals, you can mix and match what you want and fill your plate for a great meal! Check out the menu.

4. Yum Thai

Less than a 3 minute walk from Trinity, Yum Thai is situated just off Dawson Street, Yum Thai is a tiny restaurant but packs a lot of punch. Choose from a range of tasty thai dishes, all for only €5 with a student card, and they’ll pack your takeaway box to the brim. Beware though, there’s hardly any room to sit inside, so keep an eye on the weather in case you don’t want to have to eat outside.

5. Skinflint

This seriously cool pizza parlour is located on Crane Lane, just off of Dame Street, and has a wide selection of tasty pizzas (which are rumoured to be named after the staffs mothers). The regular prices (€8-12) are very reasonable but they sometimes do 2-for-1 deals for students (with valid student cards) so keep and eye out for the worthwhile meals! Check out the menu.

6. CrackBird

Who doesn’t love fried chicken? Based in an old Chinese restaurant on Dame Street (it still has the original decor), CrackBird offers a simply yet fulfilling menu of fried chicken, with the quality of their chicken that really makes it a cut above the rest. You can opt for a full or half chicken in either buttermilk batter or soy and garlic. The sides are all reasonably priced and you can wash it down with a large jam jar full of lime and ginger spritz or homemade lemonade. Similar to Skinflint, CrackBird occasionally offer 2-for-1 deals for Students; making it even better! Check out the menu.

7. Neon

Asian Street Food is how this place is advertised, it does good food fast, not fast food. Based on Camden Street, Neon offers a wide range of excellently prepared and affordable Asian dishes, all of which you can enjoy at their large, communal tables. Each meal comes with an ice cream cone and for desert there’s a Do-It-Yourself ice cream machine; just remember to bring your own chocolate flake! Check out the menu.

8. Wagamama

Part of an international chain of Japanese Noodle Houses but much better than the average chain restaurant. You can spend a lot here – it’s definitely the upper end of budget – but students can avail of the 2-for-1 mid week meals, making it excellent value for the variety of Asian dishes you can try. Check out the menu.

9. Captain Americas

Tucked away near the top of Grafton Street, Captain America’s offers classic, wholesome American food. From burgers and chips, to steaks and pizzas, Captain America’s is a lovely family diner during the day and a lively student hangout at night. They offer 2-for-1 meal deals during the week and from Monday to Wednesday. Captain America’s is worth the trip simply just to see the decor inside; wall to wall is dressed with a variety of signed music merchandise from past and present music legends! Check out the menu.

10. Jo Burger Town

Jo’Burger’s a trendy joint; a sibling of Crackbird and Skinflint, it has a similar vibe while also being unique in its own way. There is a casual atmosphere  with a menu which mainly specialises in burgers but there are other choices for those in the mood for something else, including options for those with dietary needs. Delicious, tasty food at affordable prices. Check out the menu.

David  is a marketing intern working with the Global Relations team, and is a current student of Trinity College Dublin.

Ten things to do in Dublin

As we approach the middle of summer, and with sunny days popping up randomly each week, David lists out a series of fun activities to do in the city.

1. Be Cultured: Dublin Zoo

Take a trip to one of the world’s oldest zoos and visit the newly opened sea lion cove. Located in the Phoenix Park, Dublin Zoo is easy to get and offers a whole day of entertainment. Student Tickets are available, and there are multiple picnic areas for you to bring your own food with you. If you are staying in Dublin for the summer, Dublin Zoo is a must see!

2. Be Cultured: Viking Splash Tour

Have you seen a large yellow boat driving around Dublin with it’s passengers, all wearing funny hats, cheering at pedestrians? This is the Viking Splash Tour and is one of the best tours you can take of Dublin City.  Let the Vikings show you the sites and scenes of Dublin city from land and by water in a World War II amphibious vehicle, don’t forget your viking horns!

3. Be Cultured: Explore the Temple Bar Markets

Did you know there is a food market in Temple Bar every Saturday? Or a book market on the weekends? How about the Designer Market? Temple Bar, Dublin’s Cultural Quarter, is packed with markets at the weekend. Take a wander through the cobbled streets and hidden avenues and see what you can find amongst the stalls. Market days and times can be found here.

4. Be Cultured: Take a walking tour of Trinity

Want to learn more about the history of Trinity College Dublin?  After 430 years, it’s important to separate the facts from the myths about Trinity. Why not take an official, student guided, walking tour of Trinity College Dublin? Lasting just over half an hour, you can learn about the history of the college and see inside the Old Library; a must for any Trinity Student!

5. Get Active: Stand Up Paddle Boarding

Fancy something a bit more sporty or different? Try your hand at Stand Up Paddleboarding (SUP) or kayaking. The Docklands plays host to a number of water sport companies, such as Surfdock, who offer a variety of courses for beginners to intermediates. After you’ve learnt the basics, why not take a trip down the Liffey on the board, for an alternative view of Dublin!

6. Get Active: Pier jumping at the Docklands

Staying at the docklands for now, on hot summer days you can see people cooling off by pier jumping at the Grand Canal Dock. Many people recommend wearing a wet suit or a tshirt when jumping, as it can be a fun way to cool off during the sunny days.

7. Relax: Open Air Cinema

Outdoor Cinema season is back and in full swing. With a few open air cinema companies operating within Dublin this year, there’s a large variety of films to see, weather depending of course. Rarely costing more than €5, bring a picnic rug and some popcorn and enjoy a classic film under the summer sky. Check out Happenings for the latest show times.

8. Quiet Time: Hang out and relax at the park

There’s a grand old stretch in the evenings during the summer, and what better way to spend it than relaxing in one of Dublin’s many green spaces. Relaxing in a park is one of the best ways to pass time in the summer. From Stephens Green to the Phoenix Park, there are countless open spaces for you to stretch out and just do nothing!

9. Stay Healthy: go for runs

While stopping and taking time to relax is important, it’s also good to stay active and with the summer evenings (generally) being brighter and warmer, it’s a great time to pick up running. You could join a social jogging club or pop in headphones and go solo. Running along the canal in the evening is a particular favourite of Dubliners and offers a great way to unwind while exercising.

10. Stay Healthy: Outdoor Yoga

Running not for you? That’s alright, how about some open air yoga? Following on from the success of open air cinemas, many more activities have come outdoors to enjoy the fresh air. Check out Outdoor Yoga for the latest info on free yoga mornings (though tips are encouraged)  and start your day off right.

David  is a marketing intern working with the Global Relations team, and is a current student of Trinity College Dublin.

Top Live Music Venues in Dublin

Interested in exploring Dublin’s music scene during your stay? Byrne, one of our Student Ambassadors, offers his thoughts on where to go to get your fill of live music this summer.

“In my experience, live music is truly a cornerstone of Irish culture. Musicians, back in the time of Brehon Law, were held in the third highest regard in Irish society, next only to the Poets and the King (). During the Protestant Ascendancy, Irish music was taken from the courts, and into the home. This resulted in the music mentality that has permeated Irish culture to this day. It has manifested in the form of Trad (traditional) sessions – gathering, sharing, and appreciation of live music – a long time custom in the typical country Irish home for the past centuries. Nowadays, live music is still just as prolific about the city, with venues ranging from huge stadiums, to small traditional pubs.

The Big Ones:

1. Three Arena

The Three Arena is the go to large venue for touring artists. Dublin is typically a must stop location for all the biggest touring acts. We recommend checking ticketmaster.ie to see if your favourite superstar is making a pit stop in Dublin – they probably are!

The Three Arena is super accessible – at the end of the Red Luas Line in the docks, east of the city. It can be absolutely packed, as the amphitheatre holds up to 15’000 people.

2. Croke Park

Croke Park is the giant. It is usually a year round GAA (Gaelic Athletics Association) stadium, hosting the Hurling and Gaelic Football inter-county competitions. But from time to time, the 82’300 capacity stadium is transformed into a mega amphitheatre. Music giants like U2, Take That, and Red Hot Chili Peppers have filled out the stadium, inducing an electric atmosphere. Again, look out for touring artists on ticketmaster.ie.

The Mediums:

3. The Academy

The Academy is the smaller sister of the Three Arena. It sees smaller touring acts, including many DJs and general Dance Acts and club nights. It is located on Abbey Street, just before Jervis Shopping Centre.

4. Vicar Street

Vicar Street is a multi-functioning venue, hosting a plethora of comedy, dance and music acts. It is a very personal-feeling venue, with good audience-performer engagement. Vicar Street can be found just past Christchurch, on Thomas Street.

5. Olympia Theatre

The Olympia is a charming old theatre, built in 1879. It is full of character, able to maintain an intimate atmosphere, whilst also able to hold a large enough audience. Medium size touring Artists often do gigs in the Olympia. It is located on Dame Street – straight out of the Front Gate exit from Trinity.

Irish Music:

6. Whelan’s

Whelan’s is the quintessential “gig” location. There is live music here almost every night. The performers range greatly between international touring acts, Irish popular and alternative acts, and Irish traditional acts. Whelan’s has a lively ambiance, offering a unique live music experience. Artists as big as Ed Sheeran have played this small, iconic venue (with exceedingly high demand) just in order to experience the atmosphere themselves.

7. Foggy Dew

Foggy Dew is a more traditional Irish Pub and Music venue. Here, you will find Irish Pub culture, inextricably linked with the Irish Music tradition. A blend of Irish Trad and Alternative is played in session style every evening. The venue is open and spacious – good for sociable gatherings, with friendly bar staff, accompanied with live music.

Alternative Music:

8. The Workman’s Club

The Workman’s Club is, first and foremost, a bustling club night that Trinity students flock to on Wednesdays. Every other night of the week, the Workman’s serves as an intimate gig setting for up and coming alternative and rock acts. If you are particularly interested in obscure or new bands, keep an eye on who is playing the Workman’s circuit. There is a chance that you are witnessing the next big act to emerge from Ireland!

9. District 9

District 9 has a warehouse feeling, tucked away in a suburban/residential part of Christchurch. It is often home to alternative and electronic gigs, with Trinity’s own Ents Officer using it as a venue for Trinity nights out. These are typical “club and DJ” nights, great for dancing! To give a flavour, Bakermat played this venue in the college’s official end of year party.

10. Twisted Pepper

The Twisted Pepper is your go-to dance venue. It sees an array of EDM, drum-and-bass and alternative dance acts every weekend. It is a sure-fire locations for some heavy bass and dance beats. It has typical stage area upstairs that has hosted the likes of Flume and What So Not. In addition, it has a low-ceilinged basement where you can dance until the early hours. The Twisted Pepper is an experience worth trying – particularly for those with light feet.

Dublin offers a huge variation in mood and ambiance for live music. The city is very proud of its live music culture, and we encourage everyone to experience it for themselves!”