Category Archives: Beyond the lecture hall

Things you can get up to between classes as a Trinity student

BITESIZE TOP 10 COURSES: BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL STUDIES (BESS)

Grace is one of our US students who is in her fourth year in Trinity.  Here she lets us know about her experience of studying BESS at Trinity, one of our Top 10 Courses. 

Your name: Grace Tierney

Where you’re from in the US: Annapolis, Maryland – a small coastal town about an hour from Washington, DC.

Your year of study: Final year (4th year)

Your programme of study / course:
Business, Economics, and Social Studies (BESS) – getting a dual honors degree in Political Science and Sociology. 

What made you decide to study your course at Trinity?

I liked that BESS allowed the opportunity to choose from different degree options rather than choosing a course that bound your degree from day one.

What, if anything, was the most challenging thing about moving to Ireland to study?

The most challenging thing about moving to Ireland for me, as crazy as it sounds, was that I didn’t anticipate it being challenging at all. Going in to my first year at Trinity, not expecting to miss home or experience any culture shock at all (naïve, I know) meant that when those things happened, they really threw me for a loop. Luckily, the Trinity community really helped me find my footing and my friends were there when I needed them. 

How did you overcome the challenge?

As silly as it sounds – I overcame this challenge by letting time run its course. Homesickness and culture shock are things that get better with time and patience. Committing to doing everything I could to make sure that I was building a life in Dublin and making the most of my time at Trinity, through making great friends, exploring Ireland, focusing on academics, and getting involved in societies really helped me feel at home and helped make the transition easier.

img_4437

What aspect / module of your course have you enjoyed studying the most so far and why?

I’ve really enjoyed getting a more global perspective in my subjects – especially politics. If I had gone to university in America it most likely would’ve been a school in Washington DC and while I love DC, I know that I am getting a more worldly perspective studying politics outside of the “American bubble.”

Continue reading BITESIZE TOP 10 COURSES: BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL STUDIES (BESS)

BITESIZE TOP 10 COURSES: ENGLISH

Keri is one of our US students who is in her fourth year in Trinity.  Here she lets us know about her experience of studying English at Trinity, one of our Top 10 Courses. 

I get the desire to get out and see the world; I also get that it can be scary to consider moving thousands of miles away from your family, so I commend you for coming this far. Honestly, the best thing you can do for yourself at this juncture is read all of the research you can get your eyeballs on. To that end, I’d like to share with you a little bit of insight into the reasons I chose to go to Trinity.

Continue reading BITESIZE TOP 10 COURSES: ENGLISH

From Southern California to Dublin: Culture Shocks and Assimilation – Coffee, Coins and Self-Deportation

 

By Allison Woodworth, Summer Study Abroad Blogger

“I cried,” my sister said, sheepishly admitting to getting emotional while listening to the “Outlander” soundtrack as she and her boyfriend drove through rural Ireland on their way to visit me in Dublin.  My sister and I grew up in suburban southern California, where the only sheep we saw on a regular basis was the puppet Lamb Chop and where nearby historic sites consisted of late 18th century Spanish Catholic missions. Where San Diego is dotted with palm trees and coastline, Dublin is blanketed in nature and history and rain. I mocked my sister’s emotions as an older sister should, but I couldn’t deny that Ireland was beautiful. Four weeks earlier, I’d found myself staring out the airplane window over Ireland and thinking that this surely embodied “picturesque”. I wasn’t quite sure if it was the 18 hour travel, the lack of sleep, the rabbits hopping around the runways, or the impeccable timing of an early morning arrival to catch my first Irish sunrise, but everything felt surreal.

My nine weeks in Dublin have been grand. I’ve learned to use a French press, broken a French press, almost been pancaked by bike and bus, claimed a couch in the Rathmines library as “my spot”, and was visited by Irish immigration (more on this later). I’ve enjoyed all my small culture shock moments because they personify both the fun and the difficulties of assimilation. Here are a few of my observations, experiences, and culture shock moments:

  • The Library: anyone who knows me won’t be surprised to hear that my “goals after landing” were listed as such: 1) sleep 2) find grocery allison_blog-1_photo-1store 3) locate local library. I was thrilled that the Rathmines public library was a short walk from our dorms. Andrew Carnegie funded construction of Ireland’s first public access library in 1913. Although the two story neo-Georgian building appears huge from the outside, it has a rather small, efficient layout. I did try to immediately sign up for a library card, but they insisted I be a resident or have a resident vouch for me. This was a huge disappointment – I collect library cards like some people collect shot glasses – but I compromised by reading shortallison_blog-1_photo-2 graphic novels and comics when I stopped off on my walk home from work before the closing gong around 8pm. Yes, closing gong. I’m not sure there is a PA in the library. Just before closing, the staff gives bangs a gong by the door to warn patrons to head out – or in my case to jump three feet off my seat in fright. Every time.

Photo 1 (above): Rathmines Library Gong

Photo 2 (left): Rathmines Library

Continue reading From Southern California to Dublin: Culture Shocks and Assimilation – Coffee, Coins and Self-Deportation

TRINITY BOTANY STUDENT CAPTAINS ROW 2 RIO TEAM IN EPIC 3,400 MILE ATLANTIC CROSSING

In a bid to honour the London 2012 Olympic sporting legacy,  Susannah Cass (27) a PhD student from Botany in the School of Natural Sciences, Captained a four-strong ‘Row2Rio’ team who have rowed 3,400 miles, 24 hours a day for 56 days from Portugal to reach the next Olympic host nation of Brazil. Susannah Cass, Jake Heath, Mel Parker, and Luke Richmond will cover nearly 7,000 miles by human power alone and are setting out to achieve three world records in the process; the first group to row a new ocean route, the first mixed crew and the first team of four to cross the Atlantic in a rowing boat. The Row2Rio team landed 35 miles north of Recife on Saturday, April 23rd 2016 having set off from Portugal 56 days previously.

Continue reading TRINITY BOTANY STUDENT CAPTAINS ROW 2 RIO TEAM IN EPIC 3,400 MILE ATLANTIC CROSSING

My Trip to Belfast

By Viviana Lletget (Visiting Student – Department(s) at Trinity: English, Political Science, and Sociology – Home University: University of California Berkeley, Ethnic Studies)

Part of the reason I came to study in Ireland was to learn more about its political history, particularly Northern Ireland, which is one of the four countries that makes up the United Kingdom. British colonialism ended with the Irish Partition in 1921 under the Government of Ireland Act 1920, making Northern and Southern Ireland UK territories operating in different Home Rule fashions, but in 1922 with the War of Independence, Southern Ireland became independent as the Irish Free State. Belfast has always been a place to protest and voice your political position within the mainstream two factions of Irish Nationalism or Unionism. Belfast is saturated with social movement histories, and has been affected by violent pasts that seem to still plague the city besides its increasing social solidarity among citizens. People get along, though generally speaking, Catholics and Protestants don’t really hang out in each other’s neighborhoods, but no one is bombing or vandalizing a rival’s area as before. Things have changed in Belfast, though the city is definitely still segregated.

Continue reading My Trip to Belfast

St. Patrick’s Day in Ireland

By Madison Tucky, Visiting Student, Trinity Department: English, (Home University: University of Southern California, English and Narrative Studies Major)

When I told people that I would be studying abroad in Dublin this term, the main thing that everyone wanted to talk about was how excited I was for St. Patrick’s Day. I’ve never made a big deal out of St. Patrick’s Day before, but I was also really looking forward to spending it in Ireland. I assumed the atmosphere would be really fun and that there would be a lot of tourists visiting the city. I was right on both counts and had a really wonderful day. I slept in late but eventually got up and got dressed, wearing lots of green of course and a shamrock stick-on-tattoo on my cheek. My friend and I went down to the parade route that goes through Dublin and hung out there for a little while. There were so many people who’d been waiting for the parade for hours so we were just standing at the back, but we just wanted to be out with everyone and didn’t care how much of the parade we actually saw.

Continue reading St. Patrick’s Day in Ireland

My Experience as part of the Trinity LGBT Community

By Meg Beare  

Trinity College is genuinely such a lovely place to be LGBT. Even before I came here I saw a YouTube series that Q Soc (Trinity’s  LGBT society) had made which talked about members’ positive experiences in Trinity, so I didn’t have to worry at all about whether or not to come out at college.

Continue reading My Experience as part of the Trinity LGBT Community