Tag Archives: Culture

BITESIZE TOP 10 COURSES: BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL STUDIES (BESS)

Grace is one of our US students who is in her fourth year in Trinity.  Here she lets us know about her experience of studying BESS at Trinity, one of our Top 10 Courses. 

Your name: Grace Tierney

Where you’re from in the US: Annapolis, Maryland – a small coastal town about an hour from Washington, DC.

Your year of study: Final year (4th year)

Your programme of study / course:
Business, Economics, and Social Studies (BESS) – getting a dual honors degree in Political Science and Sociology. 

What made you decide to study your course at Trinity?

I liked that BESS allowed the opportunity to choose from different degree options rather than choosing a course that bound your degree from day one.

What, if anything, was the most challenging thing about moving to Ireland to study?

The most challenging thing about moving to Ireland for me, as crazy as it sounds, was that I didn’t anticipate it being challenging at all. Going in to my first year at Trinity, not expecting to miss home or experience any culture shock at all (naïve, I know) meant that when those things happened, they really threw me for a loop. Luckily, the Trinity community really helped me find my footing and my friends were there when I needed them. 

How did you overcome the challenge?

As silly as it sounds – I overcame this challenge by letting time run its course. Homesickness and culture shock are things that get better with time and patience. Committing to doing everything I could to make sure that I was building a life in Dublin and making the most of my time at Trinity, through making great friends, exploring Ireland, focusing on academics, and getting involved in societies really helped me feel at home and helped make the transition easier.

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What aspect / module of your course have you enjoyed studying the most so far and why?

I’ve really enjoyed getting a more global perspective in my subjects – especially politics. If I had gone to university in America it most likely would’ve been a school in Washington DC and while I love DC, I know that I am getting a more worldly perspective studying politics outside of the “American bubble.”

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Wor(l)d(l)y: Irish Culture through Accents, Theatre, and Rhetoric

By Michaela Vitagliano [Visiting Student Blogger]

“When you go back for Christmas you’ll have to tell people you shook hands with Taoiseach Enda Kenny (Ireland’s Prime Minister),” my host family advises me.

“Ah, but I only saw him at the Gingerman Bar” I try to explain, until I’m cut off with a laugh and a knowing, “but they won’t know. The Irish way is to embellish a story!”

I’ve always been drawn to stories – not just what they say, but how. When traveling to a new country, I am eager to hear stories – legends, folklore, and historical events—that are part of a country’s culture. Indeed, learning a culture or another person’s identity is inextricably tied to narratives. Just think of the question, “So, what’s your story?”, prompting one to forge a coherent narrative in order to ultimately connect and communicate with others.

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Arts & Culture in the City of Dublin

By: Anna McAlpine (Visiting Student)

Departments at Trinity: School of English

Home Institution: St. Andrews, English Literature and Philosophy MA (Hons)

I have lost many an hour wandering through the weird yet glorious patchwork blanket of culture that envelops modern Dublin. Stitched through time, the thread meandering, following the winding streets of the city. Each place touched by the yarn being spun its own narrative – its tale to root it in Dublin’s cultural heritage. This is perhaps the best reason to study abroad in Dublin. If you have a penchant for the arts it is impossible not to feel the undercurrent of creativity that sweeps you through the city.

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Exploring the Irish Traditional Music Scene

Clodagh Schofield

Visiting Student

Departments at Trinity: Economics, English, Sociology

Home University: University of Sydney, Political Economy and Cultural Studies

One of the reasons I applied to Trinity was because I wanted to immerse myself in the Irish traditional music scene in Dublin. Many people’s understanding of Irish music is limited – it involves fiddles, maybe Riverdance, Guinness, Enya? Traditional Irish music is played in sessions, where people meet up, often at a given night at a pub, and then play sets of tunes pulled from thousands that most players have memorised. Often these sessions will be open to anyone who wanders in with an instrument, but many have a certain level of proficiency they expect of you (I have learned).

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Museums of Dublin

Fancy soaking up a bit of history and culture while you’re in Dublin? Why not visit one of the many museums and cultural exhibitions around the city. From Modern Art to Natural History to Leprechauns, Dublin has a lot to offer.

– The Artistic

National_Gallery_of_Ireland_Millennium_wing_outsideNational Gallery of Ireland

Dating back over 150 years and packed full of fantastic pieces from both Irish and European fine art, the National Gallery of Ireland is one of the best ways to spend an inclement afternoon in Dublin. You can take your time exploring the many wings of art and sculpture that it has on offer for free. Take a free audio guide from the information desk or take a free tour to properly immerse yourself in the European and Irish masterpieces, you’ll soon find that many hours have passed along with the bad weather. Entry: Free| Location: Nassau Street

Barry_Flanagan_The_Drummer_IMMAIrish Museum of Modern Art

The Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA), is Ireland’s leading national institution for the collection and presentation of modern and contemporary art. In addition to the collection IMMA presents a dynamic and changing programme of exhibitions from Irish and International Artists, and complimentary education and family programmes throughout the year including a dynamic Talks programme and the IMMA studio and national programmes. The Museum is housed in the 17th century Royal Hospital building in Kilmainham, Dublin, whose beautiful grounds include a formal garden, meadow and medieval burial grounds.  Facilities include a café, bookshop and free guided tours of exhibitions. Entry: Free| Location: Royal Hospital Kilmainham

– The Historic

Dublin-National-History-Museum-2012Natural Museum of Ireland – Natural History

Natural History Museums are common in every European capital and there’s a good reason why. Both adults and children alike love to marvel at the animals and creatures of the past and Dublin has one of the most impressive zoological exhibits. Located within the same complex as the National Museum of Ireland, the natural history building has been operating since 1856 and was restored in 2010 to allow visitors to get more up close and personal with the collection. The ground floor is dedicated to Irish animals, featuring giant deer skeletons and a variety of mammals, birds and fish. The upper floors of the building were laid out in the 19th Century in a scientific arrangement showing animals by taxonomic groupEntry: Free| Location: Merrion Street

National_Museum_of_IrelandNational Museum of Ireland – Archaeology and History

The National Museum Of Ireland was built in the 1880s and today is the national repository for all archaeological objects found in Ireland and is the home to over two million artefacts. The Treasury exhibition space has recently undergone a major refurbishment where you can see iconic artefacts such as the Ardagh Chalice, the Tara Brooch and the Derrynaflan Hoard. As well as these priceless artefacts,  other permanent displays include Irish Silver and glassware, the Viking exhibition, the War of Independence exhibition and more. Make sure to visit the Kingship and Sacrifice exhibition which includes recently found bog bodies! Entry: Free| Location: Kildare Street

Collins_Barracks_Museum_courtyard_westNational Museum of Ireland – Decorative Arts & History

Collins Barracks in Dublin City could be said to be the National Museum of Ireland’s largest artefact, having had a unique history all of its own in another life. Collins Barracks has been completely renovated and restored to become the National Museum of Decorative Arts and History, charting Ireland’s economic, social, political and military progress through the ages.

Artefacts on display range from silver, ceramic and glassware pieces to weaponry, furniture, examples of folk life and costume. All of these are displayed with imagination in innovative and contemporary galleries, which entice you to go further, look harder and examine more closely. Entry: Free| Location: Collins Barracks

– The Unconventional

LeprNational Leprechaun Museum

Irish people have told stories about the Leprechaun for more than a thousand years. There are many tales about him and the people he meets. The National Leprechaun Museum, the first ever attraction dedicated to Irish mythology, opens up a fun and magical world full of fascinating folklore, mythology and enchanting stories. Based in the heart of Dublin, you will explore the museum on a guided tour with a storyteller. They will bring you through the spaces and tell you more about Irish folklore and mythology. You’ll explore spaces that reflect these stories, or recreates experiences typically associated with leprechauns. The result is a series of captivating, interactive experiences – from the first ever sighting back in the eighth century, through to modern day representations of the leprechaun in film and popular culture – and plenty of adventures in between. Entry: €10 for Students| Location: Jervis Street

Little Museum of DublinThe Little Museum of Dublin

The Little Museum of Dublin opened in October 2011. The museum is spaced out on 2 floors of a Georgian house. It recalls what Dublin was all about during the 20th century and the exhibition has been widely praised in the international media. The Little Museum of Dublin tells the story of Dublin city from the year 1900 up to 2000 and showcases the remarkable transformation that the city went through in the last century. Visitors to the museum will witness the violent birth of the Irish nation, the conservative years that followed the false economic hope of the 1960s and the Celtic Tiger boom of the 1990s. Photographs, art and newspapers are some of the artefacts that tell the story of the city along with the influence of politics and power.  Entry: €3 for Students| Location: Stephens Green

National Wax Museum PlusNational Wax Museum Plus

This unique Dublin Museum is an outstandingly original visitor attraction and has been designed to deliver an interactive experience unlike any other museum in the city.  The museum is full of characters and exhibits, from historical figures to cartoon characters, and everything else in between. As indicated by the PLUS in the name, it’s not only wax figures either. The museum has much more to explore and experience, such as the Science and Discovery Zone, Recording Studio and the Wax Factor Green Screen. It’s great fun for all. Entry: €10 for Students| Location: College Green

David  is a marketing intern working with the Global Relations team, and is a current student of Trinity College Dublin.