Tag Archives: Northern Ireland

Top 8 places to check out during your first month in Ireland

By Carina Dozier

Hello! My name is Carina, a student from the University of California, Berkeley, and I’m currently studying at Trinity for the spring semester. I chose Trinity, and Dublin specifically, because of the “small-big city” vibe (much like my home city of Berkeley), the exceptional Trinity academics, and especially opportunities to travel all over Ireland and Europe! I have only been here a month, but already I love the history in Dublin, the endless beauty and quirkiness of the city, and the friendliness of the Irish people. I am lucky enough to have been able to travel to a different place in Ireland almost every weekend as well, so I wanted to share my experiences, to help any students uncertain about what to do while they’re here! Continue reading Top 8 places to check out during your first month in Ireland

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A Visit to Belfast, Northern Ireland

By Jessica Murphy, Summer Study Abroad Blogger

My name is Jessica Murphy and I am a rising sophomore at Brown University from New York City. I am still not sure what I am majoring in—or as we call it, “concentrating”—but I am interested in fields ranging from international relations to development studies. In fact, I was initially drawn to the Brown/Trinity summer study abroad programme in Dublin because of my interest in political science. The possibility of studying contemporary international politics, participating in an internship, and living in a completely new country sounded like a remarkable opportunity. I am so glad that I decided to sign up, because it has truly exceeded my (already high) expectations! Dublin is a fascinating city with a rich and layered past, and I have really enjoyed learning and exploring every single day.

Continue reading A Visit to Belfast, Northern Ireland

My Trip to Belfast

By Viviana Lletget (Visiting Student – Department(s) at Trinity: English, Political Science, and Sociology – Home University: University of California Berkeley, Ethnic Studies)

Part of the reason I came to study in Ireland was to learn more about its political history, particularly Northern Ireland, which is one of the four countries that makes up the United Kingdom. British colonialism ended with the Irish Partition in 1921 under the Government of Ireland Act 1920, making Northern and Southern Ireland UK territories operating in different Home Rule fashions, but in 1922 with the War of Independence, Southern Ireland became independent as the Irish Free State. Belfast has always been a place to protest and voice your political position within the mainstream two factions of Irish Nationalism or Unionism. Belfast is saturated with social movement histories, and has been affected by violent pasts that seem to still plague the city besides its increasing social solidarity among citizens. People get along, though generally speaking, Catholics and Protestants don’t really hang out in each other’s neighborhoods, but no one is bombing or vandalizing a rival’s area as before. Things have changed in Belfast, though the city is definitely still segregated.

Continue reading My Trip to Belfast