Tag Archives: Learning

Irish History? New to Me!

Before coming to Trinity for a semester abroad, Irish history was mostly a mystery to me.
Attending public school in the Midwestern United States, Irish history was only touched on in a minor way, classes such as AP European History, where a subtle mention of British battles to expand their occupation of Ireland were entwined with Scottish rebellions and other British-colonial expeditions. Meanwhile, the Irish community in my town was virtually non-existent, or at least as blind to their history as I am of my genealogical predecessors. Thus, events liked “The Troubles” and people like Michael Collins were treated more as answers to Jeopardy questions than consequential historical figures.

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Trinity College, a school of witchcraft and wizardry

By Josefine Klintberg.

https://spark.adobe.com/video/lpVL6WFI1iS4N/embed

I dreamed about the magic of walking over a courtyard, to gracefully descend down a majestic staircase and head into a room filled with knowledge, to follow the steps of those who came before me and made it into the history books, who made a difference.

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Studying Art History at Trinity: Learning Inside and Outside of the Classroom

By Xinyi Ye

Visiting Student Blogger, Tsinghua University

 

Before I came to Trinity, “what department will you be studying in?” was one question my friends had for me the most frequently. It’s true that I major in Chinese literature in my home university, which means it’s hard to find a course in Europe to meet the requirements of a department of Chinese literature in China. But actually, when I decided to spend a semester in Trinity, I thought it was time for me to try something different, especially try something really European and Irish. So I signed up for modules in art history, and started my semester abroad in a brand new field. I am taking two modules from the department of History of Art this semester. One of them is Introduction to History of European Art and Architecture, which is more general, and the other is Art and Sculpture in Europe in the 17th Century, which is more specific. Both modules consist of lectures and tutorials; the lectures give introductions and the professors’ ideas on the artists, the works and the concepts of a certain period of time, and the tutorials let students present their own ideas after reading and preparation, focusing on specific topics with the guidance of the professor.

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STUDENT LIFE AT TRINITY – AN EXPANSIVE STUDENT CULTURE

By: Anna McAlpine (Visiting Student to Trinity College Dublin at the School of English

Home Institution: St. Andrews, English Literature and Philosophy MA (Hons)

Before coming to Trinity I had compiled a list – a list that went on about three pages, bursting at the margins – full of the societies I was going to join when I arrived. I was like an overexcited fresher all over again. Thankfully, for the good of my academics and sleeping pattern, I managed to considerably narrow down that list. I managed to whittle it down to three extracurricular that I have thoroughly enjoyed – namely, Evening Creative Writing Class, the Metafizz and the Law Society. I will expound slightly on what each one entails in case you also want to join any of these fabulous activities!

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