Trinity’s Publications

You may feel that during term time you have more than enough to read, but you should definitely make time to check out one of Trinity’s many student newspapers and magazines. Each completely free, stacks of publications sit in various Trinity buildings for students to pick up and peruse. Because all the newspapers and magazines are student-run, you’re likely to come across an article written by a classmate as you flick through. From satire to celebrity interviews, sports stories to political pieces, Trinity’s range of publications write on topics to suit every taste. Many student societies run their own magazine to update their members on events and achievements, and departments frequently release their own publications to keep students informed. There are also independent papers which cover university news, and student features and opinions (funded by Trinity Publications).


Trinity News

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Ireland’s oldest student newspaper, Trinity News reports on stories relevant to the university’s students and staff, as well as discussing global topics from the perspective of a Trinity student. Founded in 1953, the paper is well-respected for the quality of its journalism (regularly winning Irish Student Media awards, including 2013 Newspaper of the Year). A new edition is published every fortnight, including the TN2 magazine which reports on ‘alternative culture for students’. Trinity News often stirs up debate within the university by drawing the attention of the student body to controversial topics, including contentious decisions by the SU.


The University Times

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The University Times is a newspaper endorsed by the Student’s Union to ensure students are kept informed of the latest news and events in Trinity. Launched in 2009, this year the paper won “Publication of the year” for the first time (having previously achieved “Newspaper of the year” in 2010, 2011 and 2012). The tone of the paper shifts each year as the writers and editor change; budding journalists often seek to climb the ranks of this prestigious paper to get on the mast head. Annually, as part of the SU elections, The University Times’ Editor (and SU’s Communications officer) is voted for by the students themselves, typifying Trinity’s democratic attitude to journalism.


Trinity College Miscellany (MIS©)

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This publication has flirted with a host of forms; it began as a newspaper in 1895, later became a literary journal, and it is now a magazine. Although the content covers a wide range of topics, it centres upon reviews, opinions and features. Unlike Trinity News and The University Times, MIS©’s focus is not upon communicating news stories, instead discussing issues and topics relevant to the student body. The publication is split into five sections: ‘Politically Minded’; ‘Voices’; ‘Geek Out’; ‘Gaeilge’; and ‘Agony Aunt’. The satirical ‘Agony Aunt’ section asks readers to submit their questions and comments to ‘Aunt Firecrotch’ to receive a comic (pun-laden) response.


The Piranha

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Although all of Trinity’s publications have at least an element of satire, none take it as seriously as the Piranha (Trinity’s official satirical newspaper). Haunted by controversy, the Piranha is frequently accused of ‘taking the joke too far’, and print runs have been seized and destroyed due to their inflammatory content. Recently, the newspaper came under fire for its personal attack of a candidate in the SU election. You might not agree with their messages, however you’ve got to admit they’re entertaining (and honestly without them Trinity’s publications could become a bit vanilla!)

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